Games Archives

Memory and Focus

Many people have problems with memory and focus as they age.  Whether the problems are the beginning stages of dementia or just a lack of focus, the following exercise can help to ensure that aging has less power to rob you of precious memories.  In addition, this exercise provides a possible solution for insomnia.

1.  Focus on the events of the day in order from arising in the morning until you go to sleep. The good news is that you will fall asleep long before you reach the end of the day.

2.  During the process, visualize each step of the day.  The process should include all activities, conversations, thoughts and individuals met during the day.  It might be seen as a video recording of the day played back only in your brain.  Focus on details.

3.  Initially, the mind video will be playing in fast forward.  It will be difficult to pick out the small details such as thinking over your today list or looking in the mirror while brushing one’s teeth.  In addition, scenes may jump out of sequence from morning to afternoon and then back to getting out of bed.  However, your goal is to play the video in sequence.

4.  As you continue the exercise several days in a row, you should begin to see some differences.  That which was once a just big chunk of time will begin to develop into fully visualized scenes, which include people, conversations, room decor, signs and thoughts.  Details will become clearer.

5.  It should become a daily challenge to remember more of the day.  You will become more aware of the things you normally would have done without much thought.  Since you know you must recall, your focus changes.  You are using brain cells not previously harnessed.  While the nighttime exercises may be a cure for insomnia, the daytime exercises help you to focus, improve your memory, and lower the chances of developing dementia.

By improving one’s daytime focus and recalling events of the day, it is possible for people to avoid memory loss and dementia.  Additionally, these activities can help with insomnia.

The ideas in this article are adapted from a blog on how to become a better chess player, but certainly seem appropriate for anyone concerned with dementia and having problems with memory and focus.

http://www.mychessblog.com/one-simple-mental-exercise-to-improve-your-mind-power/

 

Meditation is often associated with words such as relaxation, peacefulness, and calm. Researchers and scientists have for some time now endorsed the value of meditation. Not only do people who practice meditation feel calm and happy, they also report enhanced cognition and memory abilities. Although researchers at the Massachusetts General Hospital did not include those with Alzheimer’s Disease (AD), they sought to study the benefits of mindfulness meditation training and in my opinion, this can certainly apply to the AD population.

A recent study that was supported by the Institutes of Health, The Mind and Life Institute and the British Broadcasting Company studied the changes in the brain after an 8-week mindfulness meditation program. The findings from the study have been published in the Psychiatry Research: Neuroimaging, January 30 issue. It reports that this is the first time that changes in the brain and related improvements have been documented due to meditation over a period of time.

Magnetic Resonance Images (MRI) were taken two weeks before and after the Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction Program Program was conducted, for both the control group and the group that practiced mindfulness meditation. This form of mediation focuses on the feelings, emotions and state of mind in a non judgmental manner. The study group conducted meditation exercises for about 27 minutes daily. Their responses to a mindfulness questionnaire showed a marked improvement when compared with those made before the study began.

MRI after the mindfulness meditation program focused on parts of the brain that have shown improvement in earlier studies. The images showed an increase in the grey matter density of the hippocampus, a part of the brain that affects memory and learning. Similarly, brain parts that are related with compassion, self understanding and introspection also increased in size.

The participants reported reduced stress and this was correlated with the reduction in density at the amygdala, the part of the brain that affects the stress and anxiety that an individual experiences. However the insula, which is believed to be associated with self awareness, did not show any changes. More research in this direction may be required.  The MRI of the control group showed no changes in the same period of time.

There is no known cure for Alzheimer’s disease, but mindfulness meditation may aid Alzheimer’s disease patients in dealing with AD more effectively. Britta Hölzel, PhD, is first author of the paper and a research fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital and Giessen University in Germany. James Carmody, PhD, of the Center for Mindfulness at University of Massachusetts Medical School is the co-author.

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Alzheimer’s Disease and Sudoku

Sudoku logo-108x108Earlier this year in my other blog, I wrote about ways to boost your brain power. It was a simple list of seven things that might help counteract age-related changes in the brain and perhaps stave off Alzheimer’s disease (AD). One was to play Sudoku. You may be a pro at Sudoku or you may be a beginner like me or somewhere in-between. In any case, Web Sudoku is an amazing Web site where you can find Sukoku for every level from easy to evil. You can download the puzzles as well. The best part? They have a cool button that says, “How Am I Doing?” so if you really need to find out if you’re on the right track, you could, let’s say, cheat, no, I meant get some assistance. Click here.

According to Wikipedia, Sudoku was popularized in 1986 by the Japanese puzzle company Nikoli, under the name Sudoku, meaning single number. It became an international hit in 2005.

With this being the week of Christmas and all the hustle and bustle, it would be refreshing to stop for a few minutes and work on a puzzle. Interested in playing with someone else? Check out the two-player Sudoku Combat.

From AboutAlz.com, Happy Holidays! Although many of you are facing the challenges of Alzheimer’s disease, know someone who is, or is a caretaker, I ask you to take care of yourself as your health is the greatest gift you can give to yourself and to those you love. I leave you with this question: If health were your top priority, what would you be doing differently today? If your answer is, “I have no time,” what one tiny change can you make?

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