University of Pittsburgh Heinz Chapel

A study done at the University of Pittsburgh Alzheimer Disease Research Center, The impact of physical activity on neurocognitive function in adults with cognitive impairment, led by Kirk Erickson, PhD, found that greater amounts of walking are associated with greater gray matter volume, which in turn is associated with a reduced risk of cognitive impairment. The study, published in Neurology, showed that walking 72 blocks was necessary to detect increased gray matter volume, but walking more than 72 blocks did not spare additional volume.

According to Medscape Medical News, Dr. Erickson stated, “These findings are really quite astonishing.  Other studies have previously shown that exercise is related to brain function, but the fact that we found that walking as little as 1 mile a day is related to brain volume 9 years later, and dementia 13 years later, is truly novel and really quite impressive.”

Furthermore, BBC quotes Dr. Erickson, “If regular exercise in midlife could improve brain health and improve thinking and memory in later life, it would be one more reason to make regular exercise in people of all ages a public health imperative.”

If you have not yet started moving, what’s hold you back? Let’s start walking.

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Filed under: Alzheimer's DiseaseAlzheimer's Disease ResearchDementia

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